Daily Overview

Daily Overview
Daily Overview

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Hawaii
Hawaii is an archipelago located about 2,000 miles (3,200 km) from the U.S. mainland in the Pacific Ocean. The state is comprised of 137 volcanic islands, several atolls, and numerous small seamounts. A common explanation of the name Hawaii (also the name of its largest island) is that it was named for Hawaiʻiloa, a legendary figure from Hawaiian myth. Upwards of 1.4 million people currently live here.
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Created by @overview
Source imagery: @airbus_space

Daily Overview

Hawaii is an archipelago located about 2,000 miles (3,200 km) from the U.S. mainland in the Pacific Ocean. The state is comprised of 137 volcanic islands, several atolls, and numerous small seamounts. A common explanation of the name Hawaii (also the name of its largest island) is that it was named for Hawaiʻiloa, a legendary figure from Hawaiian myth. Upwards of 1.4 million people currently live here. — Created by @overview Source imagery: @airbus_space

I wanted to wrap up this week’s posts with a picture of the Earth, captured a few days ago on April 22 — the day that what we celebrated Earth Day for the 51st time. For the past week, this feed focused on a few, particularly exciting solutions that address the climate crisis and move our civilization into greater balance with the planet’s natural systems.

Those posts coincided with this project's first effort to use the Instagram platform to create more tangible, real-world impact. Since its start, this feed has aimed to raise awareness of the various ways our species has impacted the planet. With your support and engagement on the first Impact post, we were able to use the Overview perspective to not only raise awareness about a particular problem, but to go further and provide financial support to an organization who is addressing it head on. By nature, not all endeavors to address climate change can be profitable ones. We need to do more to support the organizations who are making these efforts and I look forward to seeing how else we can help. 111,002 trees is a great start.

The initiatives that we highlighted in posts this week — be they more sustainable forms of energy production (less carbon made by us) or brilliant ways to counteract climate change (capturing carbon made by us) — can all play a role in the collective, bigger effort. No single solution, industry, or country can solve this problem. Solving this problem will require collaboration from all facets of our civilization - business, government, science, non-profits, etc. - if we hope to address something that’s so all-encompassing, multi-faceted, and complex.

I’ll leave you with one final thought. If the climate crisis is a problem made by our own-two-hands, doesn’t that also make it a problem that we know how to solve? Perhaps the better question is, will we?

- @benjaminrgrant

📷: @nasa

Daily Overview

I wanted to wrap up this week’s posts with a picture of the Earth, captured a few days ago on April 22 — the day that what we celebrated Earth Day for the 51st time. For the past week, this feed focused on a few, particularly exciting solutions that address the climate crisis and move our civilization into greater balance with the planet’s natural systems. Those posts coincided with this project's first effort to use the Instagram platform to create more tangible, real-world impact. Since its start, this feed has aimed to raise awareness of the various ways our species has impacted the planet. With your support and engagement on the first Impact post, we were able to use the Overview perspective to not only raise awareness about a particular problem, but to go further and provide financial support to an organization who is addressing it head on. By nature, not all endeavors to address climate change can be profitable ones. We need to do more to support the organizations who are making these efforts and I look forward to seeing how else we can help. 111,002 trees is a great start. The initiatives that we highlighted in posts this week — be they more sustainable forms of energy production (less carbon made by us) or brilliant ways to counteract climate change (capturing carbon made by us) — can all play a role in the collective, bigger effort. No single solution, industry, or country can solve this problem. Solving this problem will require collaboration from all facets of our civilization - business, government, science, non-profits, etc. - if we hope to address something that’s so all-encompassing, multi-faceted, and complex. I’ll leave you with one final thought. If the climate crisis is a problem made by our own-two-hands, doesn’t that also make it a problem that we know how to solve? Perhaps the better question is, will we? - @benjaminrgrant 📷: @nasa

Daily Overview

Continuing with our Earth Week posts, today we are focusing on nuclear power. Nuclear supplies ~ 15% of the world’s electricity needs from roughly 450 nuclear power plants around the globe. While some parts of the nuclear process such as mining, transportation of materials, and plant construction do produce carbon emissions, no other energy source provides the same level of output, efficiency, and undisrupted energy during its power generation phase. Nuclear is not without its downsides, of course. First, each plant takes roughly 15 years to construct and they are often criticized for being expensive, over-budget, and reliant on government subsidies. Nuclear disasters have also been well-documented and the subsequent fear is embedded in the public consciousness. To learn a bit more, here is a story from our recent book “Overview Timelapse”: Step 1 — The Olympic Dam mine in South Australia contains the largest known deposit of uranium in the world and is the country’s largest producer of uranium oxide, or “yellowcake.” Mining the material is the first step in processing uranium for energy. Before it can be fabricated into a fuel, the uranium must be enriched through the process of isotope separation. Step 2 — Australia is home to 33 percent of the world’s uranium deposits and is the world’s third-largest producer of uranium. However, the country does not have any nuclear power plants or nuclear weapons, meaning all of the uranium mined there is shipped overseas to other countries that use the material. Uranium that is mined at Olympic Dam is shipped via Port Adelaide, located 350 miles (563 kilometers) away. The yellowcake is packaged in 200-liter drums and sent inside shipping containers on container ships like the one seen here at the port. Step 3 — More than half of the uranium exported from Australia is purchased by the United States, a country that generates around 30 percent of the world’s nuclear power. The American nuclear facility with the largest capacity is Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station near Tonopah, Arizona, which produces an average of 3.3 gigawatts, or enough power to serve roughly 4 million people. Source: @maxartechnologies / @nearmap

Freeport, The Bahamas

Daily Overview

For today’s Earth Week feature, we’re zooming in on the efforts of @coralvitareefs. Located in Freeport, Grand Bahama, this facility is the world’s first commercial land-based coral farm for reef restoration, growing coral to restore dying reefs. Why is this work so important in the context of climate change? Because, not only do coral reefs sustain 25% of marine life and up to 1 billion people’s livelihoods, but they also provide natural protection for roughly 93,000 miles (150,000 km) of coastline. With sea levels on the rise and coastal storms increasing in frequency, we should be protecting our coral so it can continue to protect us. Unfortunately, half of Earth’s reefs are already dead and more than 90% are on track to die by 2050. Meaningful action to counteract climate change, overfishing, and pollution is not happening fast enough. That’s where @coralvitareefs restoration comes into play. They use breakthrough methods to grow coral up to 50x faster — in months instead of decades — while strengthening their resilience to warming oceans. Using a land-based aquaculture farming model, a single farm can potentially supply an entire island or nation’s reefs with more diverse, resilient, and affordable coral. Despite getting crushed by Hurricane Dorian and Covid-19, they're fully committed to preserving the ecosystems that sustain us all, and ultimately plan to launch farms in every nation with coral reefs. Photography by @bahama_von / @coralvitareefs

Gonaïves, Haiti

Daily Overview

To celebrate Earth Day we’re doing our first Overview Impact post for tree planting in Haiti. It’s simple — for every like on this post, we’ll be planting one tree in Gonaïves, Haiti with our friends @edenprojects. Our sponsor for this post is Josh Elkes, co-founder and CEO of @harbourshare who has guaranteed the first 100,000 trees from the first 100,000 likes. Link in bio today to learn how Harbour is bringing speed and innovation to the digital contracting process, and saving plenty of paper / trees in the process! On this post, we’re also accepting donations for Eden if you want to add more trees to today’s total impact. Any amount that you donate will go directly to Eden and will plant trees 100,001 and beyond... - $1.50 = 10 trees - $15.00 = 100 trees - $150.00 = 1000 trees — The impact of this post will be felt at the @edenprojects Agroforestry Nursery in Gonaïves, Haiti. This facility focuses on food security and education for residents in the surrounding area. Located on the property of a school, the trees grown here are distributed to the local community. The project also equips farmers with the training and tools needed to design their plots, care for their trees, and increase their farms’ production and biodiversity.                             As you can see in the first image, the country of Haiti (left of center) has historically suffered from degraded land and deforestation, primarily during its colonial period, which stands in stark contrast to the neighboring Dominican Republic (right of center). We’ve also captured the specific nursery that we’ll be supporting - you can see an Overview of it in image 3 - and we’ll be tracking the planting that you make possible from above in the months and years ahead! — This first Impact post is made possible by @joshelkes, co-founder and CEO of @harbourshare. You can learn more about their company and the digital contracts that they’re powering by visiting the link in our bio today (harbourshare.com) or over on their feed @harbourshare. A big thank you to Josh for making this possible. — Impact Post #1 for @edenprojects, with @harbourshare Source imagery : @maxartechnologies and @edenprojects

Daily Overview

Today’s Earth Week post focuses on wind energy, one of the most promising technologies to curb carbon emissions and address global warming in the coming decades. Approximately 314,000 wind turbines currently provide just 3.7% of global electricity, leaving ample opportunity for growth of both offshore and onshore wind farms. Wind farms use less than 1 percent of the land they occupy, allowing for greater land conservation and mixed-use like farming, while power generation takes place. Furthermore, when compared to fossil-fuel powered energy, wind produces significantly less emissions – coal’s carbon footprint is almost 90 times larger, while natural gas is 40 times larger. Here is a collection of wind farm related Overviews from our collection: With the incoming tide, streaks of sediment form around the turbines of the Donghai Bridge Wind Farm in Shanghai, China. This facility was the first commercial offshore wind farm in China and has the capacity to power 200,000 homes. — The Bayannur Wulanyiligeng Wind Farm in Inner Mongolia, China, consists of more than 200 wind turbines and can generate nearly 850,000 megawatt hours of power per year at full operation. This wind farm has the capacity to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by more than 760,000 tonnes annually. — Middelgrunden is a wind farm located 2.2 miles (3.5 km) offshore Copenhagen, Denmark in the Øresund Strait. The farm’s 20 turbines provide approximately 4% of the power for Copenhagen. — Blades for wind turbines are grouped together at a manufacturing facility in Little Rock, Arkansas, USA. Individual blades are transported from this facility to wind farms on top of trucks and then assembled on-site. For a sense of scale, the longest blades here are 350 feet (107 meters) long, or 1.3 times the length of a New York City block. — Created by @benjaminrgrant Source imagery: @maxartechnologies / @nearmap

Caribbean Sea

Daily Overview

For today’s Earth Week post we’re excited to feature the efforts of @projectvesta. This Overview shows the test beach in the Caribbean where they are advancing the science of Coastal Carbon Capture — an elegant natural solution to sequestering CO2 by spreading an abundant mineral called olivine (seen in the second photo). The exact location of the beach will be disclosed in the coming months. Olivine sand that is placed in coastal waters accelerates the Earth’s natural, long-term carbon-capture process. Here’s how it works: when olivine sand is impacted by ocean waves it breaks down, which sets off a natural process called “weathering” where carbon is pulled from the ocean’s waters and the atmosphere. As a result, ocean acidity is reduced, and over geologic timescales, limestone is also formed - effectively locking the carbon back in permanently. This first @projectvesta test beach will continue to be the site of groundbreaking research, bringing 30 years of lab trials into the real world for the first time with large-scale experimentation. Text and image by @benjaminrgrant Source imagery @maxartechnologies / @projectvesta

Copenhagen, Dennmark

Daily Overview

Since it’s Earth Week, we’re highlighting possible solutions to reduce carbon emissions and mitigate global warming. Today, we’re focusing on environmentally-conscious transportation since our combined movement accounts for roughly 14% of global greenhouse gas emissions. As we look to a future where the movement of goods, vehicles, and ourselves will only continue to increase, we must consider how we can get around more thoughtfully. To put it simply — walk or bike when you can, drive electric, and fly less. — The Bicycle Snake, or Cykelslangen, is a 656-foot long (200 m) ramp in bike-friendly Copenhagen, Denmark. It was built to replace a large staircase, allowing cyclists (roughly 12,500 each day) to easily and safely navigate through the city. One study estimated the European Union could cut its transport greenhouse gas emissions by more than 25% if every country's cycling rate was the same as Denmark’s. — The Tesla Gigafactory is a lithium-ion battery and electric vehicle factory in Sparks, Nevada. The percentage of electric vehicles on the road has risen sharply in recent years as more car manufacturers have prioritized adding battery-powered options that produce significantly less emissions over the life of the car. When the Gigafactory operates at peak capacity, it produces more lithium-ion batteries in a year than the total amount produced in the entire world in 2013. — The DevLoop test site outside of Las Vegas, Nevada, was constructed to test the aerodynamics of the Hyperloop — a futuristic mode of passenger and/or freight transport that operates through sealed vacuum tubes pushing pods of air resistance or friction at high speeds. The Hyperloop would allow for travel faster than some short-haul flights, thereby significantly reducing emissions for individuals or goods traveling these distances. — Created by @benjaminrgrant Source imagery: @visitcopenhagen / @maxartechnologies

Daily Overview

Earth Day is this Thursday so this week I’ll be sharing posts related to places & ideas that mitigate the perils we face with a warming planet. After looking down at the planet for the last 7 years and learning more about how we impact it, I think the complex crisis that we face all comes back to the fact that we have released, and continue to release, too much carbon into the Earth's atmosphere. Almost everything that we do produces some form of carbon emission in its processing, transportation, or consumption. This excess carbon warms the planet, both in the oceans’ waters and on land, leading to more volatility in our weather, which can disrupt and devastate our civilization that’s been constructed with predictable temperatures, precipitation, and water-levels in mind. If we’re simplifying the problem of a warming planet, we can also think about solutions in a similarly simplified manner. First, if our activity produces too much carbon, we need to employ smarter, more sustainable technologies to generate and produce the things we need - like electricity, food, transport, etc. Second, we can implement technologies that remove carbon from the atmosphere. The best ones we have at the moment are trees - which have been photosynthetically feeding on carbon for millions of years. Brilliant people are trying to develop others. So to start off the week, here’s the Westmont Rooftop Solar Project in San Pedro, California. 2 million square feet of solar panels now cover what was previously unused area on the roof of a distribution center. The panels have a bifacial design, meaning they collect reflected light from the surface of the roof in addition to direct sunlight. This enables the panels to generate up to 45% more power than traditional rooftop solar panels and power 5,000 nearby homes. I love this example because it shows that we can not only be more thoughtful about how we generate our energy, but also the land we use to do so. I have a few posts lined up for the coming days, but I’m also curious what solutions you’d like to see on the feed this week? Let me know in the comments. Here’s to a better future for our one and only home! - @benjaminrgrant

Daily Overview

Here’s a final reminder that our SPRING PRINTSHOP SALE ends tomorrow. Use code “SPRING20” for 20% off your entire order, including our new framed prints! Link in bio today to check out our entire collection. - Prints seen here include: 1. Boca Raton, Florida 2. Antarctica Sea Ice 3. Golden Gate Park 4. Chicago Polar Vortex - Prints created by @benjaminrgrant Source Imagery @maxartechnologies

Tampa Bay
Tampa Bay is a large natural harbor connected to the Gulf of Mexico on the west central coast of Florida, USA. It is surrounded by a major metropolitan area comprised of three main cities — Tampa, St. Petersburg, and Clearwater — and upwards of 3.1 million residents. The bay is also Florida’s largest open-water estuary, providing over 400 square miles (1,000 square km) of habitat for a wide variety of wildlife.
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Created by @overview
Source imagery: @airbus_space

Daily Overview

Tampa Bay is a large natural harbor connected to the Gulf of Mexico on the west central coast of Florida, USA. It is surrounded by a major metropolitan area comprised of three main cities — Tampa, St. Petersburg, and Clearwater — and upwards of 3.1 million residents. The bay is also Florida’s largest open-water estuary, providing over 400 square miles (1,000 square km) of habitat for a wide variety of wildlife. — Created by @overview Source imagery: @airbus_space

Nile River
The Nile River is commonly regarded as the longest river in the world, flowing for 4,258 miles (6,853 km) over 11 countries in northeastern Africa. In this Overview, it is shown flowing north through Egypt, forming a large delta before emptying into the Mediterranean Sea. Civilizations since ancient times have depended on the waters of the Nile to flood and fertilize the surrounding desert lands.
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Created by @benjaminrgrant
Source imagery: @airbus_space

Daily Overview

The Nile River is commonly regarded as the longest river in the world, flowing for 4,258 miles (6,853 km) over 11 countries in northeastern Africa. In this Overview, it is shown flowing north through Egypt, forming a large delta before emptying into the Mediterranean Sea. Civilizations since ancient times have depended on the waters of the Nile to flood and fertilize the surrounding desert lands. — Created by @benjaminrgrant Source imagery: @airbus_space