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22-year-old Japanese musician eill (@_eill_) started singing and composing music on her laptop at age 15 — blending K-pop, J-pop, soul and R&B influences to produce her own unique sound and send the message, “I’m always the protagonist in my life.” ⁣
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Since her breakout single “MAKUAKE,” eill has refused to be categorized into a specific genre. “I made this song full of determination to start my own life on my own terms,” she says. But that’s not to say she’s not willing to collaborate. During the pandemic eill worked online with several artists, including Pink Sweat$ and Taeyeon. ⁣
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Earlier this year she released her first major label single, “Koko de Iki wo Shite,” a song written as the ending theme for the TV anime “Tokyo Revengers.” “I wrote down what the heroine was feeling,” says eill. “Music can gently convey the true feelings that no one can express. If one day it becomes someone’s light, the darkness will turn into light.” ⁣
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Photo by @_eill_

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22-year-old Japanese musician eill (@_eill_) started singing and composing music on her laptop at age 15 — blending K-pop, J-pop, soul and R&B influences to produce her own unique sound and send the message, “I’m always the protagonist in my life.” ⁣ ⁣ Since her breakout single “MAKUAKE,” eill has refused to be categorized into a specific genre. “I made this song full of determination to start my own life on my own terms,” she says. But that’s not to say she’s not willing to collaborate. During the pandemic eill worked online with several artists, including Pink Sweat$ and Taeyeon. ⁣ ⁣ Earlier this year she released her first major label single, “Koko de Iki wo Shite,” a song written as the ending theme for the TV anime “Tokyo Revengers.” “I wrote down what the heroine was feeling,” says eill. “Music can gently convey the true feelings that no one can express. If one day it becomes someone’s light, the darkness will turn into light.” ⁣ ⁣ Photo by @_eill_

🌈✨ “Pride Month or not, getting my story out there is important because the Black and Latinx trans community needs more representation so we can gain respect,” says Veondre Mitchell (@veondremitchell). “If you’re comfortable, I encourage you to share your stories.”⁣
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Although the 17-year-old creator styles her hair as a way to express herself all year round, June just feels different.⁣
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“Another thing I love doing especially during Pride Month is braiding my hair because I can whip it around and be more free than I ever am,” she says. “Pride Month is the prime to have that feeling.”⁣
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Check out our story right now to hear more from Veondre, as we continue celebrating members of the LGBTQ+ community who #ShareWithPride. ⁣
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Photo by @veondremitchell

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🌈✨ “Pride Month or not, getting my story out there is important because the Black and Latinx trans community needs more representation so we can gain respect,” says Veondre Mitchell (@veondremitchell). “If you’re comfortable, I encourage you to share your stories.”⁣ ⁣ Although the 17-year-old creator styles her hair as a way to express herself all year round, June just feels different.⁣ ⁣ “Another thing I love doing especially during Pride Month is braiding my hair because I can whip it around and be more free than I ever am,” she says. “Pride Month is the prime to have that feeling.”⁣ ⁣ Check out our story right now to hear more from Veondre, as we continue celebrating members of the LGBTQ+ community who #ShareWithPride. ⁣ ⁣ Photo by @veondremitchell

Instagram

“Inspiration comes everywhere for me — sometimes it’s fueled by emotion and sometimes it’s as simple as that skirt would look cute with this shirt. And if it makes me feel like a real rock star, even better.” —Musician and performer Brock Painn (@cheapainn) Brock doesn’t remember a time not being obsessed with fashion. “I’d always steal my mom’s heels and makeup and practice for hours walking and trying it all on in hopes that one day I’d be able to navigate it like a pro. I think it’s safe to say my younger self would be proud of me today.” “I wanna celebrate kids like me, people who feel like they don’t fit in because of what they wear or how they look or how they act,” says Brock. “I always remind myself that it’s best to live your truth freely to inspire others rather than hide in the shadows all your life.” Reel by @cheapainn Music by @mileycyrus

Instagram

“I want my work to change the narrative and restore honor to Black fatherhood.” —Entrepreneur and father of three Sean Williams (@sean4real)⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Sean founded the Dad Gang (@thedadgang) five years ago to showcase active Black fathers through positive messages, images and affirmations and debunk the myth that most Black dads are absent or inactive. “My dream is that it not only shatters the negative stereotype of Black dads but empowers all dads to be active dads and live their best dad life,” says Sean.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ “Being an active dad has enhanced my life in so many ways, mostly by allowing me to relive a lot of those fun playful moments that we as adults tend to forget. It’s like I’m living my second childhood with and through my kids.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ To protect Black children, we need to educate them on the realities of the world we’re living in and make them aware of the dangers they can potentially face when they step outside. I do this while also empowering them to love themselves and their differences and above all treating others the way they would want to be treated.⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ This Father’s Day, I want to tell my fellow Black dads to stand tall and be proud of how amazing they are. To be able to take care of our families and communities, put smiles on the faces of those that depend on us, to go out into the world and excel in our careers and build legacies and a foundation for future generations to thrive off of — all while still being marginalized, profiled, stereotyped, treated unjustly — is an incredible feat that should not go uncelebrated. We are strong and resilient men of honor. We are dad goals.”⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Photos of @sean4real by @steve__e

At 22 years old, Maya Ghazal (@ghazalmia) is the first female Syrian refugee pilot. In the few short years since she fled her home country of Syria to the UK, she’s accomplished her dream of solo flight. Her next goal is to become a commercial pilot, and bring other women up with her. “I want to use my story and platform to highlight the importance of having more women in aviation,” says Maya. “I feel that when one woman succeeds, we all succeed and we can create a world where young people and females are allowed to flourish and think outside the box without labels to hold them back.”⁣
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As a goodwill ambassador for UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency (@refugees), Maya advocates for refugees around the globe. “I want to give hope to refugees, as well as other young people and women, that everything is possible. I also use my voice to smash stereotypes about refugees and show that we can be the role models we want to see,” says Maya.  #WorldRefugeeDay⁣
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Photo by @ghazalmia

Instagram

At 22 years old, Maya Ghazal (@ghazalmia) is the first female Syrian refugee pilot. In the few short years since she fled her home country of Syria to the UK, she’s accomplished her dream of solo flight. Her next goal is to become a commercial pilot, and bring other women up with her. “I want to use my story and platform to highlight the importance of having more women in aviation,” says Maya. “I feel that when one woman succeeds, we all succeed and we can create a world where young people and females are allowed to flourish and think outside the box without labels to hold them back.”⁣ ⁣ As a goodwill ambassador for UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency (@refugees), Maya advocates for refugees around the globe. “I want to give hope to refugees, as well as other young people and women, that everything is possible. I also use my voice to smash stereotypes about refugees and show that we can be the role models we want to see,” says Maya. #WorldRefugeeDay⁣ ⁣ Photo by @ghazalmia

Instagram

“Juneteenth is an Independence Day for Black Americans,” says Lynae Vanee (@_lyneezy). “Honoring it is just another step in unlearning American lore and learning exactly how systems exist to marginalize specific groups.”⁣ ⁣ Lynae is an Atlanta-based creator, poet and former high school teacher who uses her platform and her master’s degree in African American studies to “spill the tea” on topics that she finds have been ignored or misrepresented.⁣ ⁣ “Black people are generally left out of narratives essential to American history,” says Lynae. “Sharing Black stories amplifies Black voices. It grants Black storytellers the autonomy to take up space in rooms not meant for them and imagine worlds others may not have even considered possible.”⁣ ⁣ Today, we’re honoring Juneteenth, which commemorates the day — June 19, 1865 — that enslaved African Americans in Texas learned of their freedom. Check out today’s story to learn more. #ShareBlackStories⁣ ⁣ Reel by @_lyneezy

Instagram

On today’s #WeeklyFluff meet Kylo (@iamkylo_), a 4-year-old tuxedo ragdoll cat who is going with the flow.⁣ ⁣ “He always insists on drinking from the kitchen tap. He’ll meow at us until we turn it on then proceed to shove his head under the water,” says Kylo’s human Sarah. “A lot of people think he has bad vision, but he’s perfectly healthy. Just strange.” 😹⁣ ⁣ Video by @iamkylo_

Instagram

When you try to go to sleep but your brain decides to have a dance party. 🕺🕺🕺 The party continues, right now on our story. Reel by @i.sahaj Music by @asha.bhosle

“Activism has made me who I am today — resilient, persistent and passionate.” —17-year-old Elijah McKenzie-Jackson (@elijahmckenziejackson)
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Two years ago, Elijah became an organizer with Fridays For Future, a global movement of school strikes to protest the lack of action on the climate crisis. Since then, the UK-based student’s involvement in initiatives and protests — including an expedition into the Amazon rainforest to discuss the safeguarding of its future — has continued to raise awareness of global environmental injustices and the impacts of the climate crisis on marginalized communities as well as ecosystems.⁣
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“The future I am fighting for is not a green world that is built of oppression, but one which embraces diversity, culture and difference which works on the idea of equity. I believe this must be mirrored in the climate movement, giving more space to people who have to shout in comparison to others who can just talk and be heard equally,” says Elijah.⁣
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“Everyone is needed to create change and to achieve climate justice. We all have a voice, it is just finding a way to feel empowered enough to use it. Everyone’s talents, skills and experiences are invaluable and so important to further action within the people and places of power.”

Photo of @elijahmckenziejackson by @harryrosestudio

Instagram

“Activism has made me who I am today — resilient, persistent and passionate.” —17-year-old Elijah McKenzie-Jackson (@elijahmckenziejackson) ⁣ Two years ago, Elijah became an organizer with Fridays For Future, a global movement of school strikes to protest the lack of action on the climate crisis. Since then, the UK-based student’s involvement in initiatives and protests — including an expedition into the Amazon rainforest to discuss the safeguarding of its future — has continued to raise awareness of global environmental injustices and the impacts of the climate crisis on marginalized communities as well as ecosystems.⁣ ⁣ “The future I am fighting for is not a green world that is built of oppression, but one which embraces diversity, culture and difference which works on the idea of equity. I believe this must be mirrored in the climate movement, giving more space to people who have to shout in comparison to others who can just talk and be heard equally,” says Elijah.⁣ ⁣ “Everyone is needed to create change and to achieve climate justice. We all have a voice, it is just finding a way to feel empowered enough to use it. Everyone’s talents, skills and experiences are invaluable and so important to further action within the people and places of power.” Photo of @elijahmckenziejackson by @harryrosestudio

“It is my hope that the design world evolves to reflect the diversity of the world we live in. Design is as diverse as we are. We need to value that reality.” —Antwaun Sargent (@sirsargent) ✨⁣
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Antwaun is a New York City-based writer and curator who focuses on Black contemporary art and design. He is also the grant committee lead for @design and @brooklynmuseum’s newly launched program, #BlackDesignVisionaries. Through a series of grants and mentorships, the program seeks to uplift aspiring and up-and-coming Black designers who embody the design values of simplicity, craft and inclusivity.⁣
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“Design is fundamental to how we understand the world,” says Antwaun. “Everything in our culture is designed. It can be small, like creating a doodle on a piece of paper, or large, like creating a building. Black artists and designers are often overlooked in those conversations although they have designed communities, buildings, books, fashion and objects that have really changed our experience of the world. To have the opportunity to help shine a light on Black design practice is really an honor and fits in with my work to critically examine Black artistic practice.”⁣
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Learn more about #BlackDesignVisionaries (and get details on how to apply 📬) by heading to @design, and check out a few of @sirsargent’s favorite Black design accounts on our story today.⁣
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#ShareBlackStories⁣
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Photo by @sirsargent

Instagram

“It is my hope that the design world evolves to reflect the diversity of the world we live in. Design is as diverse as we are. We need to value that reality.” —Antwaun Sargent (@sirsargent) ✨⁣ ⁣ Antwaun is a New York City-based writer and curator who focuses on Black contemporary art and design. He is also the grant committee lead for @design and @brooklynmuseum’s newly launched program, #BlackDesignVisionaries. Through a series of grants and mentorships, the program seeks to uplift aspiring and up-and-coming Black designers who embody the design values of simplicity, craft and inclusivity.⁣ ⁣ “Design is fundamental to how we understand the world,” says Antwaun. “Everything in our culture is designed. It can be small, like creating a doodle on a piece of paper, or large, like creating a building. Black artists and designers are often overlooked in those conversations although they have designed communities, buildings, books, fashion and objects that have really changed our experience of the world. To have the opportunity to help shine a light on Black design practice is really an honor and fits in with my work to critically examine Black artistic practice.”⁣ ⁣ Learn more about #BlackDesignVisionaries (and get details on how to apply 📬) by heading to @design, and check out a few of @sirsargent’s favorite Black design accounts on our story today.⁣ ⁣ #ShareBlackStories⁣ ⁣ Photo by @sirsargent

Instagram

“We are like cheerleaders to the world’s youth.” —ATARASHII GAKKO! (@japan_leaders) ATARASHII GAKKO! is an outlandish, four-girl progressive Japanese pop group — clad in school uniforms — that blends punk energy with elements of pop, rock, jazz, hip-hop and self-choreographed avant-garde dance in their performances. Unlike many idol groups, whose personalities, lyrical themes and choreography are polished to perfection, band members Mizyu, Suzuka, Kanon and Rin combine in supercharged exuberance, embrace the weird and do things differently. “We just do things in a way that is natural to us and true to ourselves. We really do wear our hearts on our sleeves.” ATARASHII GAKKO! translates as ‘New School,’ but the band explains that “symbolically it represents the Seishun [youth] spirit of living your life with open eyes and an open heart at full force. No regrets.” “We love that our music and performances resonate with a global audience,” they say. “We express our work through the Japanese culture lens but youth energy is universal. We strive to keep surprising you, making you dance and feel the joy of being alive!” Reel and music by @japan_leaders

🌈✨ “I #ShareWithPride all year round, I created @existloudly for this very reason,” says Tanya Compas (@tanyacompas), who founded the nonprofit in the summer of 2020 to create spaces and community for Black LGBTQ+ youth in the UK.⁣
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“Exist Loudly is a love letter to my younger self,” says the founder. “It’s a commitment to Black LGBTQ+ young people that there will be spaces for them to just exist, without minimizing their identity to feel safe, loved or cared for.”⁣
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Check out our story right now to learn more about Exist Loudly and to discover more organizations around the world supporting the LGBTQ+ community this #Pride month and beyond.⁣
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Photo by @tanyacompas

Instagram

🌈✨ “I #ShareWithPride all year round, I created @existloudly for this very reason,” says Tanya Compas (@tanyacompas), who founded the nonprofit in the summer of 2020 to create spaces and community for Black LGBTQ+ youth in the UK.⁣ ⁣ “Exist Loudly is a love letter to my younger self,” says the founder. “It’s a commitment to Black LGBTQ+ young people that there will be spaces for them to just exist, without minimizing their identity to feel safe, loved or cared for.”⁣ ⁣ Check out our story right now to learn more about Exist Loudly and to discover more organizations around the world supporting the LGBTQ+ community this #Pride month and beyond.⁣ ⁣ Photo by @tanyacompas

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